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Archive for the ‘Maps’ Category

Maps, maps, and more maps!

In Maps on October 13, 2014 at 1:08 am

Make and/or find four maps, at minimum, for your global issues project presentation.  Download and/or copy/paste them into a PowerPoint presentation.  Then print the PowerPoint (using the Handouts-4-per-page format; DO NOT PRINT FULL PAGES OF SLIDES).  Save the PowerPoint presentation in the INBOX on the school network.  (Also, save it into your individual folder on the H drive.)  The MLA citation AND URL must appear on each slide.

Your MLA citation will read something like:

“Sitka, Alaska.”  Map.  Google Maps.  Google, 31 October 2014.  Web.  31 October 2014.

You must also add a URL for any online maps.

(1)  The Show-®-World link is a great place for most everyone to start.  Some of you will also note that specific atlases are linked to this blog.  You should be able to find multiple maps for your research.

(2) Those of you with topics related to the following–

–will find World Bank maps at the links above.

(3) EarthPulse at National Geographic’s website will be of interest to those needing maps related to:

  • population growth
  • deforestation
  • fishing
  • water

(4)  ISIS:  A Rogue State Along Two Rivers is a grand interactive map.

(5) Maps related to multiple topics are available at the World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment.

Climate | Conservation | Governance | Hazards | Health | Population | Poverty | Sustainability

(6)  Earth Observatory at NASA has great images related to many of your topics.  Go there and do a search.

(7)  Check out the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment for graphics related to the Arctic climate change.

(8)  Gender.  Those with topics related to gender be sure to check out the new eAtlas of Gender at:  http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-gender/en.

(9) Malaria.  Check out the Malaria Atlas Project at:  http://www.map.ox.ac.uk/.

(10) The Guardian newspaper of the UK is a great source for Infographics, many of which are maps.  Take a look it here.

(11)  The Population Reference Bureau has a host of maps at their site.  See their Data Finder.

(12)  ArcGIS Explorer:  Make your own map.

(13)  Ebola:  Look at the long list of Ebola maps on the APHG blog.  (Scroll down to Ebola on the right-hand side of that blog.)

(14)  Religion.  See the superb graduated circle maps at the Pew report on the Global Religious Landscape.

(15)  Health topics.  Check out WHO’s Global Health Observatory Map Gallery.

(16)  Climate Maps.  Here’s a site from NOAA.

Be sure to look at your scoring guide to see how important maps are to your final presentation.  For many of you, four maps will not be sufficient to show the global nature of your problem or issue.

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Maps, maps, and more maps!

In Maps on October 28, 2012 at 11:17 pm

Make and/or find four maps, at minimum, for your global issues project presentation.  Download and/or copy/paste them into a PowerPoint presentation.  Then print the PowerPoint (using the Handouts-4-per-page format; DO NOT PRINT FULL PAGES OF SLIDES).  Save the PowerPoint presentation in the INBOX on the school network.  (Also, save it into your individual folder on the H drive.)

Your MLA citation will read something like:

“Sitka, Alaska.”  Map.  Google Maps.  Google, 31 October 2014.  Web.  31 October 2014.

(1)  The Show-®-World link is a great place for most everyone to start.  Some of you will also note that specific atlases are linked to this blog.  You should be able to find multiple maps for your research.

(2) Those of you with topics related to the following–

–will find World Bank maps at the links above.

(3) EarthPulse at National Geographic’s website will be of interest to those needing maps related to:

  • population growth
  • deforestation
  • fishing
  • water

(4) The  Online Atlas of the Millennium Development Goals of the World Bank has maps related to these goals:

  • Eradicating poverty and hunger
  • Achieving universal primary education
  • Promoting gender equality
  • Reducing child mortality
  • Improving maternal health
  • Combating disease
  • Ensuring environmental sustainability
  • Developing a global partnership (i.e. debt and aid)

(5) Maps related to multiple topics are available at the World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment.

Climate | Conservation | Governance | Hazards | Health | Population | Poverty | Sustainability

(6)  Earth Observatory at NASA has great images related to many of your topics.  Go there and do a search.

(7)  Check out the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment for graphics related to the Arctic climate change.

(8)  Gender.  Those with topics related to gender be sure to check out the new eAtlas of Gender at:  http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-gender/en.

(9) Malaria.  Check out the Malaria Atlas Project at:  http://www.map.ox.ac.uk/.

(10) The Guardian newspaper of the UK is a great source for Infographics, many of which are maps.  Take a look it here.

(11)  The Population Reference Bureau has a host of maps at their site.  See their Data Finder.

(12)  ArcGIS Explorer:  Make your own map.

Be sure to look at your scoring guide to see how important maps are to your final presentation.  For many of you, four maps will not be sufficient to show the global nature of your problem or issue.